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Litigation Update: Court Denies Motion for Summary Judgment in Card Compliant Whistleblower Case

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Delaware ex rel. French v. Card Compliant LLC et al. is a qui tam case – a suit brought when a whistleblower exposes alleged fraud against the government with the incentive of receiving a portion of the recovery as a reward. The defendants include Card Compliant LLC, a third-party company that some defendants used to issue gift cards and assume certain gift card responsibilities, and numerous other defendants. 

 

Among the various allegations, the plaintiffs claim that some defendants didn’t account for the transfer of liability in the manner its contracts specified. According to the state’s allegations, the liability wasn’t truly transferred and, thus, defendants had the obligation to remit unclaimed property to Delaware but didn’t do so. 

 

On April 30, 2018, Judge Paul Wallace denied defendants’ Motion for Summary Judgment seeking the dismissal of all claims.

 

The defendants argued that the plaintiffs cannot legally establish a Delaware False Claims and Reporting Act fraud claim because “the undisputed facts demonstrate the retailers had no legal obligation to pay the unredeemed balances on gift cards issued by and assigned to the card companies.” 

 

The court, however, said the defendants’ subjective beliefs regarding the validity of the giftco structure remain unresolved, and several disputed issues preclude resolution of whether the defendants knowingly acted in bad faith to avoid monetary obligations to the government. 

 

“The plaintiffs must be given the opportunity to present to a jury evidence of defendants’ actual knowledge, subjective belief, and purported bad faith,” the judge wrote.

 

The defendants also argued that a ruling by a previous judge in the case should be struck down. The ruling held that the relationship between the creditor/customer and the retailers (rather than the relationship between the card company and the retailers) is the relevant relationship for the purposes of escheat. 

 

The defendants suggested that the judge made this ruling without the benefit of reviewing documents and testimonial evidence from Delaware audits and VDAs in which the state took the position that when a gift card is assigned before dormancy, the card company is the relevant debtor for escheat purposes. 

 

Judge Wallace ruled that the defendants failed to establish that the prior ruling was clearly wrong and that extraordinary circumstances exist, thus preventing him from second-guessing the previous judge’s decision. 

 

Finally, the judge pointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit’s decision in the Marathon Petroleumcase. In that case, the court stated that the federal priority rules do not prevent the state from examining books and records to determine the unclaimed property holder.

 

The defendants had sought refuge through application of the DFCRA’s Administrative Proceedings Bar and took the position that if Delaware had previously engaged in the type of statutory audits (and VDA procedures) the Third Circuit spoke on to examine their giftco activities and escheat obligations, then the defendants had been subject to administrative proceedings that would preclude the court from exercising jurisdiction over the state’s case. 

 

The judge wrote, “To act as a bar, those prior administrative proceedings must have been ‘substantially based upon allegations or transactions which are subject of a civil suit or an administrative proceeding in which the Government is already a party.’ It would be indeed incongruous if the administrative proceeding meant to discover and enforce a Defendant’s true escheat obligation could cover more ground than a qui tam suit claiming fraud in the same allegations or transactions.”

 

Noteworthy issues that remain to be determined in the case include:

  • When are cards escheatable to Delaware?
  • Who is the true holder of the cards – the retailers or the third party?
  • Can cards that have already been issued be assigned to another affiliate or third party?
  • Was the giftco structure a reasonable effort to comply with the law or did the companies act with fraudulent intent?

This case is scheduled to go to trial in September. UPPO will continue to monitor and report on developments in this case.

Tags:  Card Compliant  Delaware  gift cards  litigation  qui tam  unclaimed property  whistleblower 

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