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News & Press: Legal News

Appeals Court Flips Marathon Ruling

Tuesday, December 5, 2017   (0 Comments)
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On Dec. 4, 2017, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court’s dismissal of Marathon Petroleum’s lawsuit against Delaware.

 

Marathon uses a gift card management company incorporated in Ohio, a state that exempts such property from escheatment. After Marathon objected to an $8 million estimated liability for gift certificates for which the company said it had issuance and redemption records, third-party auditor Kelmar – on behalf of Delaware – requested records related to the gift card company’s creation and operations. 

 

Among the information requested were contracts, meeting minutes, vendor agreements and accounting records. Marathon refused, arguing that such request is outside of Delaware’s jurisdiction. Again, Kelmar suggested it would turn over the issue to the attorney general for enforcement action. 

 

In February 2016, Marathon filed suit. arguing violation of the federal priority rules and the Fourth Amendment. The Marathon case also took issue with the state’s estimation practices. 

 

Delaware argued that the Texas v. New Jersey applies only to disputes between states, not audits of private entities. The defendants also argued that Marathon’s claims were premature, as they would have their chance to make their case in state court if they continued to resist turning over requested documents. Attorneys for Marathon took issue with the state’s interpretation of federal law and compared the nine-year audit of the company to a “fishing expedition.”

 

On Sept. 23, 2016, a U.S. District Court agreed with Delaware’s arguments and dismissed the case. In overturning the District Court ruling, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals stated, “…we disagree with [the] conclusion that private parties cannot invoke federal common law to challenge a state’s authority to escheat property.”

 

The Appeals Court, however, agreed with the earlier court’s ruling that the case was not yet “ripe.” “To the extent the companies are challenging the scope or means of the examination in this case, the claim is not ripe, since the state has taken no formal steps to compel compliance with the audit,” the court wrote.

 

The case has been referred back to the District Court to clarify that the case’s dismissal is without prejudice, giving the plaintiffs to refile the lawsuit at a later date.


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